TABLE OF CONTENTS

Overview        3

People's Budget NYC At a Glance        4

Budget & Policy Priorities         5

I. Defund the Police        5

II. Dismantle All Systems of Violence and Punishment        11

III. Invest in Communities        15

Appendix: Talking Points and Key Statistics         39

Acknowledgements        47

About New York City Democratic Socialists of America (NYC-DSA)

NYC-DSA is a local branch of the National Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), which is the largest leftist organization in the United States. New York City Democratic Socialists of America (NYC-DSA) supports the people's demand to defund the police and abolish the prison industrial complex.

 

The DSA is a big tent organization that represents the leftist political interests of organizers across the country. DSA is working collaboratively with community members, labor unions, and grassroots organizations building the mass, multi-racial democratic abolitionist movement we need right now.

 

Read more about NYC-DSA's Policy Platform here including our plan to End the Carceral State.

OVERVIEW

New York City has its priorities backwards.

Decade after decade, City Hall’s relentless defunding of housing, public healthcare, social and educational services, transit access, and other basic human needs has created immense social distress: in a city rich with hedge fund billionaires and luxury real estate magnates, millions face illness, fear of violence, housing and food insecurity, social isolation, and despair. Rather than addressing these by investing in the Black, working class, and impoverished communities hardest hit by budget cuts and COVID-19, the city government has chosen to compound the crisis by aggressively building up its police force, jailing infrastructure, family surveillance apparatus, and other systems of punishment and social control to enforce this deepening inequality. Rob the working class to furnish the wealthy, then use police to manage the fallout.

We need safety, not policing.

Policing isn’t about safety, it’s about control. Police were established to protect the interests of the wealthy and to discipline labor; racialized violence has always been a part of that mission. The police cannot be reformed away from their core function. Police do not actually prevent violent crime from occurring, nor do they effectively mitigate its aftermath. The police maintain inequality through racist harrassment, surveillance, and outright brutality. Police make us less safe, not more. We believe in a city where poverty, mental health, and drug issues are not criminalized. These and related challenges must be responded to with care and compassion, not cuffs and cages.

It is time for a dramatic budgetary reversal.

We will no longer tolerate New York City being a playground for the wealthy in which cops protect property and power with violence and impunity. DSA is committed to defunding the NYPD, divesting from other systems of violent control, and investing in the social services and community resources necessary for our city to emerge from this deadly period with everything we need to flourish.

This is how we will achieve the city we deserve.

This document is a deep dive into the nuts and bolts of our budgetary platform. We hope candidates will run on these ideas, elected officials will develop policy based on them, and allied labor unions and community organizations will fight for them. Our vision is no utopian fantasy, but rather a viable, achievable platform for the city we deserve. The time is now to act boldly. Real public safety demands it. Justice for Black lives demands it. The promise of New York City demands it.

PEOPLE’S BUDGET NYC AT A GLANCE

To achieve a safe, healthy, and just New York we must end all damaging criminal punishment interventions and invest instead in resources that build up individuals and communities. This document presents a path to achieve these goals in  three-parts and focuses on using existing City funds and changing policy under the purview of City government. It will evolve over time to reflect additional input from community organizations and changing conditions.

This document focuses on policy under the purview of the New York City government. However, we know that dismantling police violence will require action from every level of government. The Mayor and City Council must also work with New York State and Federal governments to loosen the carceral system’s stranglehold on our city and further the cause of Black and working class freedom. See also NYC-DSA’s platform to end the carceral state.

  1. Defund the police. Cut the NYPD budget by at least $3 billion, the police force by 50%, and immediately freeze all new hiring and overtime to free up money for working class communities. Remove police from our schools, mental health and drug use response, subways, houseless "outreach”, public shelters and hospitals.

  1. Dismantle all systems of violence and punishment. Halt the construction of new jails, demand the closure of the Rikers Island Jail, as well as all jails, prisons, and juvenile detention facilities. Defund by 50% and freeze all new hiring and overtime in budgets for prosecutors’ offices, family surveillance and separation programs, and other violence-based responses to poverty. Ban all local cooperation with ICE and prohibit city resources from being used to aid immigration enforcement.

  1. Invest in real community safety and needs. Develop a program to create billions in new investments within the Fiscal Year 2022 Budget, followed by billions in new investments each year, using money divested from police, courts, jails and other systems of surveillance and punishment. Replace criminal punishment interventions with fully funded community-based models of safety, which are shown to be more effective than policing. Invest in the robust public health and social services, good jobs, economic security, and dignified housing that actually keep our communities healthy and safe. Reverse all previous service cuts and systemic under-investment in our communities.

BUDGET & POLICY PRIORITIES

I. Defund the Police

Core Demand: The City Council must cut the NYPD budget by at least $3 billion and police force by 50% and freeze all new hiring and overtime to free up money for working class communities. Remove police from our schools, mental health and drug use response, subways, "outreach” to unhoused New Yorkers, public shelters and hospitals. It is not enough to simply defund the police. We must also dismantle the systems that protect them from accountability and drastically diminish their ability to inflict violence and harm on New Yorkers.

 

Specific Budget and Policy Proposals[1]

It is in the power of the Mayor and the City Council to reach these goals by implementing the following budget and policy changes. We do not assume each proposal will take place simultaneously and put them forth as changes that could be made individually. The “savings” represent the potential money freed up by the specific change proposed and do not account for potential budgetary overlap with other changes.[2] 

Changes to the NYPD Budget

Savings: Approximately $1.9 Billion from the NYPD expense budget and $1.4 Billion from the NYC general fund (fringe benefits and pensions) for a total of roughly $3.3 Billion in savings.

Savings: Approximately $455 million in expense budget plus $40 million capital budget.

Savings: Approximately $4.8 million.

Savings: Approximately $36 million combined, with the Strategic Response Group accounting for approximately $68 million and Vice Enforcement approximately $18 million.

Savings: Well over $351 million in total savings. Approximately $13 million in savings based on Justice Committee’s estimates of if officers were fired in just 10 high profile police murders, plus significantly more if NYPD fired all officers who have killed and brutalized New Yorkers.[13] Approximately $21 million in savings from NYPD expense budget for cutting the pay of officers placed on “modified duty” as a result of abusive policing practices, and approximately $15 million from the general NYC fund. Approximately $302 million in city savings for deducting payouts for police misconduct judgments and settlements from NYPD budget. During Bill de Blasio’s tenure as mayor, these settlements cost the city an average of $252 million annually.[14]

Savings: Approximately $247 million for 2,730 police.

Savings: Transfer NYPD’s $178 million traffic enforcement budget (3,243 cops) in FY22 preliminary budget to DOT to hire civilian workers.

Savings: Approximately $456 million. In the FY21 budget, implementing a hiring freeze would have saved approximately $208 million from NYPD expense budget and $152 million from NYC general fund; halting the intake of police academy classes would have saved approximately $45 million from the NYPD expense budget and $41 million from the NYC general fund; canceling the NYPD cadet corps would have saved approximately $10 million from the NYPD expense budget.[16]

Savings: This includes $1.1 billion for general property improvements and $79.3 million appropriated for a new 40th precinct house.  

 

Savings: Approximately $3 million in savings from excessive public relations budget; at least $300 million in savings from eliminating overtime (with some estimates as much as $800 million[21]); approximately $27 million for surveillance budget[22]; dismissing the 700+ officers who extended beyond the NYPD’s budgeted headcount in FY21 for a total savings of approximately $133 million.[23] 

Savings: Approximately $57 million.

Changes to local legislation, policy, and practice   

II. Dismantle all systems of violence and punishment

Core Demand: Halt the construction of new jails, demand the closure of Rikers, jails, prisons, and juvenile detention facilities. Defund by 50% and freeze all new hiring and overtime in budgets for prosecutors’ offices, family surveillance and separation, and other violence-based responses to poverty. Ban all local cooperation with ICE and prohibit city resources from being used to aid immigration enforcement.

 

Specific City Budget & Policy Proposals

These goals can be reached by implementing the following budget and policy changes under the purview of the City Council and the Mayor. Enact a four-part plan to halt the construction of new jails, stop the flow of people into the carceral system, support those targeted by the carceral state, and decarcerate and close current carceral facilities.

III. Invest in Communities

 

Core Demand: The City Council must develop a program to use money divested from police, courts, jails and other systems of surveillance and punishment to replace all criminal punishment interventions with fully funded community-based models of safety and invest in robust public health and community services. These billions in new investments should begin in Fiscal Year 2022 and continue each subsequent year to fund good jobs and income supports, dignified housing, healthcare, child and elder care, mental healthcare, education, transit, food security, full accessibility, and free time for culture and community for all New Yorkers.

Specific City Budget & Policy Proposals

It is in the power of the Mayor and the City Council to reach these goals by implementing the following budget and policy changes, which we’ve broken into two areas of focus:

A) Care Not Cops: We need to replace policing and criminal punishment interventions with fully funded community-based models of real public safety to counteract acute, already existing issues of systemic violence and poverty. This part of the plan calls for targeted investment to address the following community safety challenges: Domestic and Gender Based Violence, Youth Violence, Drugs, Sex Work, Mental Health Crises, School Discipline and Safety, Houselessness, and Child Abuse and Neglect. Together these represent both the major concerns of communities throughout the city and the vast majority of calls for criminal justice intervention.

B) Building Strong, Healthy and Just Communities:  We also need to invest in strong and healthy communities, in order to prevent and minimize such crises more generally. Real public safety means all New Yorkers have their basic needs met. This part of the plan calls for investing in robust public health and community services, funding good jobs, economic security, dignified housing, healthcare, child and elder care, mental healthcare, education, transit access, food security, and free time for culture and community. 

 

A. Care Not Cops: Community Models of Crisis Intervention and Prevention

Fully fund police-free community-based models of safety that are shown to be much more effective than policing: community-based models of violence prevention, noncoercive mental health services, mental health crisis-intervention, transformative justice, health and wellness resources, harm reduction, and noncoercive drug and alcohol treatment.[46] Programs include but not limited to:

(see also sections on Youth Violence,  Domestic Violence & Mental Health)

Immediate Demands

Longer-Term Measures

 

B. Building Strong, Healthy and Just Communities

 


APPENDIX: TALKING POINTS AND KEY STATISTICS

  1. Overarching Principles

  1. Why We Should Defund the NYPD

Key Statistics

  • At $11 Billion per year, New York City spends far more on policing than any other city in the country. The NYPD has twice as many police officers (36,000) as Los Angeles (9,000 LAPD, 9,000 Sheriff's Dept.), the next most-policed US city. But there is no evidence that more cops and police budgets keep our communities safe and healthy.
  • The NYPD’s $11 Billion budget is more than New York spends on the Departments of Health, Homeless Services, Housing Preservation and Development, and Youth and Community Development combined.
  • The NYPD’s expense budget of $6 Billion per year mostly goes towards wages and overtime for 36,000 officers (and 19,000 civilian employees).
  • In addition, the NYPD monopolizes over $5 Billion from our city’s general fund for xand benefits that other public workers don’t enjoy and shielding themselves from misconduct allegations when they harass, brutalize and murder us.
  • Millions are spent on policing shelters and subway stations, where New Yorkers face harassment and arrests for “crimes of poverty” like houselessness and fare evasion.
  • Millions are spent on military-grade weapons and gear, like armored cars and assault rifles, which are used to violently suppress protests.
  • While the rest of the city is choked by overtime freezes, the NYPD is on track to rack up $800 Million in overtime pay this fiscal year alone, enough to hire 9,000 new social workers or quadruple the number of school counselors.
  • NYPD enforcement targets majority Black neighborhoods for low-level conduct. The defensive cry against cutting police budgets is that crime will go up. However, crime is at an all-time low in New York City and has declined by every meaningful measure over the past five years. Even though crime and arrests have been going down for years, more than 1,300 officers have been added to the force since 2015. The budget has grown by 27% since 2010.

  1. Why We Should Dismantle Systems of Violence and Punishment

Key Statistics

  • We spend more than $2 Billion every year to prosecute and cage New Yorkers.
  • New York City spent $447,336 to incarcerate one person in 2020 for the full year, or roughly $1,222 a day.
  • This summer the population of Rikers was the lowest it’s been since 1946. We can close Rikers without opening new jails which would cost $8–11 Billion dollars.
  • Jails do not fix crime. Instead they trap people in a loop of incarceration, usually in response to a low-level offense or diagnosed mental health issue.
  • Around 80% of people admitted to DOC’s custody had one or more prior admission.
  • Around 70% percent of people discharged from DOC custody stay fewer than 60 days. Of those, nearly a quarter are discharged within three days.
  • Nearly half of the people in New York City jails have a mental health diagnosis.
  • The vast majority (90%) of New Yorkers in jail have not been convicted of a crime.
  • 77% of people in NYC jails have been arrested but not yet tried.
  • 11% are re-incarcerated for technical parole violations.
  • Every year ACS removes over 8,000 children, mostly Black, Latinx and poor, from their homes and places them in foster care to face dire outcomes.
  • While only 15% of children in the city are African-American, they make up 41% of the foster care population.
  • Each year the City investigates roughly 60,000 families, mostly Black, Latinx and poor, for mostly unsubstantiated allegations. The vast majority of families are investigated for allegations related to poverty that should be addressed with support, not punishment.
  • Families below the poverty line are 22 times more likely to become targets of the family regulation system than families who have incomes slightly above it.

  1. Why We Should Refund Our Communities

Key Facts and Statistics

  • Study after study shows that a living wage, access to holistic health services and treatment, educational opportunity, and stable housing are more successful in reducing crime than more police or prisons.
  • 60% of New Yorkers don’t have enough emergency savings to cover at least 3 months’ worth of expenses like food and rent.
  • Nearly 20% of New York City residents already live below the poverty line (earning less than $24,300 for a family of four).
  • One in Four New Yorkers can’t pay rent.
  • 1.5 Million New Yorkers can’t afford food.
  • Houselessness in New York City has reached the highest levels since the Great Depression of the 1930s. One in every 106 New Yorkers is unhoused — that’s nearly 80,000 men, women and children.
  • Last year’s budget cut hundreds of millions from schools, hospitals, parks, youth development, and sanitation — the essential services we most desperately need to make it through this pandemic.
  • While allowing the NYPD to hire at least 1,800 new cops this year, the Mayor and City Council threatened to lay off at least 22,000 of New York City’s public sector workforce who make up our essential workforce: nurses, teachers, firefighters, personal care aides, childcare workers, and more. Instead, these city workers and their unions were forced to furloughs and benefit reductions.  
  • The Mayor is demanding another $1 billion in cuts to New York City’s essential city workers, while exempting all NYPD, in his proposed budget for Fiscal Year 2022.
  • New York State has lost more than 2 million jobs because of Covid-19, State budget cuts will eliminate 250,000 more and decimate essential services.

  1. Resist austerity.

Until the NYPD is halved, there must be no discussion of public sector layoffs, public worker benefit cuts, or further cutting of services. We demand the reversal of all previous service cuts and systemic underinvestments in our communities.

Key Facts and Statistics

  • Last year’s budget cut hundreds of millions from schools, hospitals, parks, youth development, and sanitation — the essential services we most desperately need to make it through this pandemic.
  • While allowing the NYPD to hire more than 900 new cops last year, the Mayor and City Council threatened to layoff at least 22,000 of our public sector workforce, who make up our city’s essential workers: nurses, teachers, firefighters, personal care aids, childcare workers, and more.
  • The Mayor plans to reduce New York City’s public sector workforce by 12,000 this year, cutting our nurses, teachers, EMTs, and other essential workers at a time when we need them the most.
  • New York State has lost more than 2 million jobs because of COVID-19. State budget cuts will eliminate 250,000 more and decimate essential services.

  1. Tax and Control the Rich.

At the local level, win reparations from the rich for wage theft, rent exploitation, and financial poverty profiteering. Pressure the state government to Tax the Rich by passing all six bills in the Invest in Our New York Act that will tax high incomes, exorbitant wealth, and big businesses to raise $50 billion per year, and allow New York City to set our own taxes without needing permission from Albany.

Key Facts and Statistics

  • On top of our public health crisis, our state is facing an almost $60 billion budget deficit over the next four years. But rather than tax the rich, Governor Cuomo wants to make deep cuts to necessary social services like schools, hospitals and transportation. This means firing teachers, closing hospitals, and shutting down the subway and bus services we rely on.
  • New York State now has 120 billionaires (up from 112 last year). During the pandemic, their wealth overall has increased by more than $77 Billion.
  • New York’s biggest financial tycoons and real estate barons have furnished the NYPD Foundation with over $100 Million, mostly in surveillance technology and weaponry.
  • Since 2014, the Comptroller’s office has assessed more than $30 Million in prevailing wage violations — a tiny portion of what could be returned to working class New Yorkers with a city government that took an aggressive approach to monitoring and disrupting the misconduct of the rich.
  • There are six tax-the-rich revenue raising proposals in the Invest in Our New York Act that, if passed, would raise $50 Billion per year for the New York State budget. The Billionaire’s Wealth Tax alone would raise over $23 Billion.  
  • 9 out of 10 New York voters favor raising taxes on ultra-millionaires and billionaires.

 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We would like to thank the many organizations whose crucial work laid the foundation for People’s Budget NYC, as well as the groups and individuals who provided input and feedback for this proposal:

   Afrosocialists and Socialists of  

   Color Caucus

   Disability Justice

   EcoSocialist

   Housing Justice

   Immigrant Justice

   Labor Branch

   Socialist Feminist

   Healthcare


[1] Budget proposals lift up and build on the demands of Communities United for Police Reform’s 2020 NYC Budget Justice Campaign among others cited within.

[2] These numbers are based predominantly on the preliminary Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 budget but some may be from the FY 2021 budget due to details not included in the preliminary FY 2022 budget.

[3] What’s Next? Safer and More Just Communities Without Policing. A collaborative document organized and edited by Mariame Kaba (Interrupting Criminalization: Research in Action, Project NIA).

[4] Dignity in Schools Campaign

[5] Urban Youth Collective - Vision for Police-Free Schools

[6] What’s Next? Safer and More Just Communities Without Policing. A collaborative document organized and edited by Mariame Kaba (Interrupting Criminalization: Research in Action, Project NIA).

[7] A New Vision of Public Safety for New York City, Tiffany Caban 

[8] The NYPD's Mental Illness Response Breakdown (The City)

[9] The Path Forward: How to Defund the NYPD, Invest in Communities, and Make New York Safer (CPR, 2020) 

[10] NYPD Unit At Center Of Protest Policing Has Dozens Of Officers With Long Misconduct Histories (The Appeal)

[11] Lawmakers Say NYPD VICE Squad Is A Hotbed Of Corruption and Sexual Abuse (Gothamist)

[12] NYPD Cops Cash In On Sex Trade Arrests With Little Evidence While Black And Brown New Yorkers Pay The Price

[13] The Path Forward: How to Defund the NYPD, Invest in Communities, and Make New York Safer (CPR, 2020) 

[14] The Path Forward: How to Defund the NYPD, Invest in Communities, and Make New York Safer

[15] Financial Outlook for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, New York State, August 2019

[16] The Path Forward: How to Defund the NYPD, Invest in Communities, and Make New York Safer

[17] Extreme Makeover: Precinct Edition

[18] Do Cops Serve the Rich? Meet NYPD’s Private Piggy Bank (Gothamist)

[19] Defund Police Foundations (Politico)

[20] The Path Forward: How to Defund the NYPD, Invest in Communities, and Make New York Safer

[21] NYPD Blows Budget Again (The Indypendent)

[22]The Path Forward: How to Defund the NYPD, Invest in Communities, and Make New York Safer

[23] The Path Forward: How to Defund the NYPD, Invest in Communities, and Make New York Safer

[24] The Policing and Social Justice Project

[25] NYPD Using Data to Fight Drug Overdoses (WNYC)

[26] More than 50 Advocacy Organizations Call on Mayor DeBlasio to Suspend Broken Windows Policing and Reduce NYPD Intervention Actions as Coronavirus Spreads, Communities United for Police Reform 

[27] 8 to Abolition

[28] Ibid

[29] Ibid

[30]NYC Open Platform

[31] A New Vision of Public Safety for New York City, Tiffany Caban 

[32] Ibid

[33] A New Yorker’s Guide to Building Community Care and Safety by Closing Rikers with No New Jails

[34] End to Pretrial Detention and Money Bail Policy Platform, Movement 4 Black Lives

[35] Abolitionist Recommendations to Defund NYPD with No New Jails & By Closing Rikers Now

[36] How Probation and Parole Feed Mass Incarceration in the United States (Human Rights Watch)

[37] Probation and Parole (Prison Policy Initiative)

[38] Want to Shrink the Prison Population? Look at Parole. (The Marshall Project)

[39] Abolitionist Recommendations to Defund NYPD with No New Jails & By Closing Rikers Now

[40] Don’t Forget Prosecutors When it Comes to Defunding (Filter Mag)

[41] The Election That Could Thwart New York City's War On Drugs (The Appeal)

[42] DSA-NYC Immigrant Justice Platform 

[43] Organizations doing this work in New York City include Parent Legislation Action Network, Movement for Family Power, The Bronx Defenders Family Defense Practice, and The upEnd Movement on a national level

[44] Family Separation in the Medical Setting: The Need for Informed Consent Policy Brief

[45] Reimagine Support (Movement for Family Power)

[46] Abolitionist Recommendations to Defund NYPD with No New Jails & By Closing Rikers Now

[47]As called for in the Build Communities Platform 2.0

[48] A New Vision of Public Safety for New York City, Tiffany Caban 

[49] Programming to provide at these centers has already been developed by organizations such as NYC Transformative Justice Hub and Common Justice

[50] Abolitionist Recommendations to Defund NYPD with No New Jails & By Closing Rikers Now

[51]As called for in the Build Communities Platform 2.0

[52] Draw from existing models, such as CAHOOTS 

[53] Public Advocate for the City of New York. Improving New York City’s Responses to Individuals in Mental Health Crisis (September 2019) 

[54] Community Access Crisis Respite Center

[55] Public Advocate for the City of New York. Improving New York City’s Responses to Individuals in Mental Health Crisis (September 2019) 

[56]Ibid

[57]Ibid

[58]As referenced in the Build Communities Platform 2.0, one such program is Howie the Harp (HTH), a peer-run program that trains people with mental health recovery experience to work in Human Services. Since 1995, HTH has been led by people of color

[59] Research Domain Criteria, Wikipedia

[60] New York State Department of Health 

[61] Homeless Can’t Stay Home

[62] Housing Justice for All

[63] Homeless Can’t Stay Home

[64] Ibid

[65] Housing Justice for All

[66] Ibid

[67] Homeless Can’t Stay Home

[68] Homeless Can’t Stay Home

[69] Ibid

[70] Right to a Roof Coalition

[71] DecrimNY

[72] DecrimNY

[73] Abolitionist Recommendations to Defund NYPD with No New Jails & By Closing Rikers Now

[74] The upEnd Movement

[75] Cops Not Counselors (ACLU)

[76] A New Yorker’s Guide to Building Community Care and Safety by Closing Rikers with No New Jails

[77] A New Vision of Public Safety for New York City, Tiffany Caban 

[78] A New Vision of Public Safety for New York City, Tiffany Caban 

[79] Health Justice Agenda for NYC Schools 

[80] A New Vision of Public Safety for New York City, Tiffany Caban 

[81] Wraparound Basics Or What Is Wraparound, National Wraparound Initiative 

[82] buildCommunities platform

[83] Dignity in Schools Campaign - New York

[84] As called for by the Urban Youth Collaborative in their report, The $746 Million a Year School-to-Prison Pipeline.

[85] Ibid

[86] As called for in the NYC-DSA Immigrant Justice Platform

[87] Ibid

[88] Free CUNY. Make CUNY Free Again: The Cases for a Free CUNY

[89] CUNY Rising Alliance. Fund CUNY ASAP

[90] Abolitionist Recommendations to Defund NYPD with No New Jails & By Closing Rikers Now

[91] Ibid

[92] Build Communities Platform 2.0

[93] Ibid

[94] NYC-DSA Immigrant Justice Platform

[95]Chronic Injustice: Centering Equitable Healthcare and Policies for Covid-19 and Other Chronic Conditions, COVID-19 Working Group New York

[96] Ibid

[97] Ibid

[98] NYC-DSA Housing is a Human Right Platform 

[99] Right to a Roof Coalition

[100]  Right to a Roof Coalition

[101] ÑYC-DSA Ecosocialist Platform: Transit as a Public Good  

[102] Abolitionist Recommendations to Defund NYPD with No New Jails & By Closing Rikers Now

[103] “Transforming Transit”, Align NY

[104] Abolitionist Recommendations to Defund NYPD with No New Jails & By Closing Rikers Now

[105] Ibid

[106] Based on existing mediation programs and services like this

[107] The New York State Excelsior Conservation Corps

[108]Abolitionist Recommendations to Defund NYPD with No New Jails & By Closing Rikers Now

[109] NYC Open Platform

[110] Abolitionist Recommendations to Defund NYPD with No New Jails & By Closing Rikers Now

[111] A New Yorker’s Guide to Building Community Care and Safety by Closing Rikers with No New Jails

[112] New York City Department of Parks and Recreation

[113] buildCommunities Platform

[114] As recommended by the Community Services Society’s report, Extending the High School Year through Universal Summer Jobs for New York City Youth (February, 2016).

[115] As called for in the NYC-DSA Immigrant Justice Platform

[116]Public Bank NYC

[117] M4BL Reparations Now Toolkit, Movement 4 Black Lives

[118] Reparations Ordinance and Resolution, Chicago Torture Justice Memorials (CTJM)